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Curated research library of TV news clips regarding the NSA, its oversight and privacy issues, 2009-2014

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Primary curation & research: Robin Chin, Internet Archive TV News Researcher; using TV News Archive service.

Speakers

James Clapper
Director of National Intelligence
CSPAN 01/29/2014
Mikulski: We need to determine the constitutionality. Would you, cause if it's not constitutional, that’s it. What, General Clapper, would you consulting with the department of justice, the white house, ask for an expedited review by the Supreme Court of the United States to determine the constitutionality of these programs so that we don't continually shop for a legal opinion that we want, either one side or the other. Clapper: I’ll discuss this with the Attorney General. i am not up with the protocol for seeking a reading by the supreme court.
James Clapper
Director of National Intelligence
CSPAN 01/29/2014
Clapper: With all the controversy, we all felt and still feel what were doing was legal, was oversighted, both by all three branches of the government . There is a current court ruling, a fourth amendment ruling, which of course, if data is provided to a third party. it doesn’t, uh Mikulski: General Clapper, there are 336 different legal opinions. Clapper: I realize that. Mikulski: 36 say the program is constitutional. Judge Leon said it's not. I’m not avoiding them. Clapper: Exactly. Nor are we. Mikulski: I respect the appeals process, but I think we’ve got to get a constitutional ruling on this as quickly as possible. I think the American people are entitled to knowing that and I think the men and women who work at NSA need to know that and I think those of us who want to (?) the review and reform effort need to know that.
James Clapper
Director of National Intelligence
CSPAN 01/29/2014
Clapper: I could not agree with you more about the need for clarity on these issues for the women and men of the intelligence community who are trying to do the right thing.
Susan Collins
U.S. Senator R-Maine, Member of Senate Select Committee on Intelligence
CSPAN 01/29/2014
Collins: I’ve read the DIA assessment and it is evident to me that most of the documents stolen by Mr. Snowden have nothing to do with the privacy rights and civil liberties of American citizens or even the NSA collection program.
Susan Collins
U.S. Senator R-Maine, Member of Senate Select Committee on Intelligence
CSPAN 01/29/2014
Collins: Indeed, these documents and we’ve heard the number of 1.7 million documents are in any cases multi-pages. If you printed them all and stacked them, they would be more than three miles high. I say that to give the public more information about how extraordinarily extensive the documents that he stole were. And they don't just pertain to the NSA. They pertain to the entire intelligence community and include information about military intelligence, our defense capabilities, the defense industry.
Michel Flynn
Lt. General, Director Defense Intelligence Agency
CSPAN 01/29/2014
Flynn: I think the greatest cost that is unknown today, but what we will likely face, is the cost in human lives on tomorrow's battlefield or in some place where we will put our military forces when we ask them to go into harms way. That is the greatest cost we face with the disclosures that have been presented so far. And like I said the strongest word I can use, this has caused great damage to our national security. Collins: So it has caused great damage to our national security and you would agree that it puts at risk potentially the lives of our troops? Is that accurate? Flynn: Yes, ma'am. Collins: Thank you.
Matthew Olsen
Director National Counterterrorism Center
CSPAN 01/29/2014
Olsen: (in reference to the damage impact from Snowden leaks) what was seen in the last six to eight months is an awareness by these groups and their increasingly sophisticated and awareness of our ability to monitor communications and specific instances where they changed the ways in which they communicate to avoid being surveilled or being subject to her surveillance tactics. Collins: And obviously, that puts us at greater risk of an attack? Olsen: It certainly puts us at risk of missing some thing that we are trying to see, which could lead to putting us at risk of an attack, yes. Collins: And just a quote you back to yourself, you said this is not an exaggeration. This is a fact. And you stand by that. Olsen: I absolutely do, yes.
Jay Rockefeller
U.S. Senator (D-West Virginia) Member of Senate Select Committee on Intelligence
CSPAN 01/29/2014
Rockefeller: it's something I feel so strongly about a have to make a statement. The President announced that section 215 telephone metadata should no longer be stored by the government. He asked the Director of National Intelligence to come up with new options. Ultimately, the decision rests with Congress and this Senator absolutely opposes contracting out this inherently core governmental function. What seems to be lost in this conversation is that everyday we face a growing and evolving threat from multiple enemies that could cost American lives. The terrorist threat remains real and ongoing. The government's ability to quickly assess the data that has protected American terrorist attack.
Jay Rockefeller
U.S. Senator (D-West Virginia) Member of Senate Select Committee on Intelligence
CSPAN 01/29/2014
Rockefeller: practically, we do not have the technical capacity to do this. And certainly it’s impossible to do so without the possibility of massive mistakes or catastrophic privacy violations. There are hundreds and hundreds of telecommunication companies in this country. They each have their own niches. So you just can't talk about one or two big ones. They're all going to have to go into this protocol. Prospects are just daunting and to me, ridiculous. They do not want to become agents of the government. They do not want to become the governments guardians of data. They stress that.The telecom providers themselves do not want to do this and for good reason. Telecom companies do not take an oath of allegiance to protect domestically and internationally. Small matter? No it isn’t. It’s a big matter. They are neither counterterrorist agencies nor privacy protection organizations. They are businesses interested in the bottom line.
Richard Burr
Senator (R-North Carolina) Member of Senate Select Committee on Intelligence
CSPAN 01/29/2014
Burr: General Clapper, over the last several years, the committee has had some difficulty receiving timely briefings after significant events or terrorist attacks, despite the commitment we had from you that those briefings would happen within 24 hours. Moving forward, will you renew your commitment to the committee to brief us on those events in a timely fashion? Clapper: yes, Sir, we always strive to do that.
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